Academy Curricular Exchange
Columbia Education Center 
Science


TITLE:    WHERE IS MY PEANUT?

AUTHOR:   Vicki Vrooman, Holland Hall Middle School,
          Tulsa, OK

GRADE LEVEL:   Appropriate for grades 2-8

OVERVIEW:  All people need to be able to be able to observe
and record facts about the world around them.  This lesson
will enhance these skills for real world experiences.

PURPOSE:  The purpose of this activity is designed to
increase students' skills in observation, recording, fact
and opinion.  This activity forces students to use their
observation skills and then convert their observations to
hard data.

OBJECTIVE(s):  As a result of this activity, the students
will :
1.  Observe a peanut,
2.  Record facts about the peanut,
3.  Use measurement devices to record facts,
4.  Draw pictures if necessary,
5.  Use the data to find the peanut after hiding it
6.  Have others use your data to locate the peanut

RESOURCES/MATERIALS NEEDED:  Peanuts in the shell, bowls,
rulers, string, balances(if available), paper, pencil

ACTIVITIES AND PROCEDURES:
1.  Divide the class into small groups
    (4-6 students per group.)
2.  Provide each group with rulers, string, balances,
    paper, pencil, and a bowl of peanuts.
3.  Direct the students to select one peanut from the
    bowl.  they are to "get to know" their peanut through
    observation.
4.  Have the students record as many facts about their
    peanut as possible.  They should use diagrams,
    measurements, descriptions of their color and shape.
    Stress the importance of keeping accurate records.
5.  Direct the students to return their peanut to the
    bowl and mix the peanuts.  They should then lay the
    peanuts out on the table and try to locate their own
    peanut.
6.  Ask the students to return their peanut to the bowl
    and mix the peanuts.  They should then lay the
    peanuts out on the table and try to locate their own
    peanut.
7.  Direct the students to give their notes to any other
    member in the group and have that student find the
    peanut.
8.  Provide students with a list of observations and
    inferences and ask them to identify as such.  Have
    students discuss which observations are most useful
    in identifying the peanuts.

TYING IT ALL TOGETHER:  This activity would work well to
begin a rocks and minerals unit where students will be
observing and recording data.  This also works well when
working cooperatively.
This activity is fun and easy to do.  When the students
finish the activity they get to eat the peanuts!!
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John Kurilecjmk@ofcn.org

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