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    How to Start Science Clubs

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Here are some questions and pointers for starting a Science Club:

1. Who Wants to Form a Club? photo of girl mixing
Identify 5 to 10 students and at least 1 adult who want to form a Science Club. Remember, Science Clubs can be part of something already going on like a Scout Troop, 4-H Club, Big Brother and Sister Program, Play Group, or a Tutoring Program.
2. Who Will Be Club Leaders?
If possible, find 3 people who would like to be “Captains” or “Leaders. ” We recommend a parent, a school person, and a youth.
3. When Will You Meet?
Establish a good day and time to meet every week.
4. Where Will You Meet?
Decide on a central place to meet. Get a written okay from the host organization — a school, a community center, a church, or a parent providing his/her home.
5. How Will Members Get To and From Club?
You may have to arrange transportation for members getting to and going home from the club. Try to use public transportation with a buddy system and encourage parents to car pool. Club leaders should be careful about providing transportation themselves unless they have proper authorization and insurance.
6. What Topics Do You Want To Explore?
Encourage students to look at science and resource materials to pick out topics they want to learn more about. Help them make a calendar and schedule of topics to cover for a few months.
7. What Resources Can You Find?
Given topics to learn about, research and explore, what kinds of resources are available? Check out materials and experiment ideas at the library, bookstore, or on the Internet (such as our Lessons, Quick Activities and Tours). Look at the phone book Yellowpages to locate possible community resources for career talks, field trips, or presentations related to topics being studied. Check out who you know and who they might know that could provide materials, field trips, or ideas for projects. When you pick out some experiments, try to borrow or find donated materials.
8. What’s Next?
Have fun with science. Follow your schedule and begin doing experiments, inviting people to come and share related careers or hobbies, and taking field trips. We suggest that individuals or the club keep a journal of what topics are explored, experiments conducted, what was learned, problems and ideas that surfaced, what community resources were utilized, and what kinds of careers were related and learned about during meetings.

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To Science Club Guidelines To Experiment Tips
To Reach Out! Michigan Home Page Updated 6 Mar 2010